• Arborland

5 Books to Read with Your Child for International Women's Day

Updated: Mar 15



International Women's Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the historical, cultural, and political achievements of women. The day is also observed in support of taking action against gender inequality around the world. One significant way to honor this day with your child is to dive into books which celebrate women empowerment and convey the message of gender equality. Here are our top picks;


  1. You Are Not A Princess (And That's Ok!) by Mélanie Berliet

This book is an ode to little girls who say "no" to princess costumes and "yes" to adventures, daydreaming, and exploring the world. This book celebrates girls who don't mind getting messy and understand that their worth resides within, and not some damsel in distress with a fairytale ending.


2. I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

The bestselling memoir by Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai.

Malala was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. She fought for her right to be educated and in 2012, nearly lost her life for the cause; she was shot while riding the bus on her way home from school. Now Malala is an international symbol for peaceful protest and women's rights.


3. A is for Awesome!: 23 Iconic Women Who Changed the World by Eva Chen


This alphabet board book brings a new, educational twist to your good old "A is for apple" bit. This book will in turn introduce your younger child to women who've made discoveries, advanced science, and made the world a bit better.


4. Queen of Physics: Wu Chien Shiung and the Secrets of the Atom by Teresa Robeson


When Wu Chien Shiung was born in China 100 years ago, most girls did not attend school; no one considered them as smart as boys. With the encouragement and support of her parents, her groundbreaking discoveries proved to the world that women belonged in the lab.


5. Grace for President by Kelly DiPucchio


This story not only gives readers a fun introduction to the American electoral system but also teaches the value of hard work, courage and independent thought. When Grace discovered that the United States has never had a female president, she was determined to be the first and immediately joined her class's mock election to start her career and encountered hardships along the way. Grace's journey offers an inspiring example of how to choose our leaders.



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